Arousal Cream

Overview of Arousal Cream

Dosage Strength

  • Arousal 1: Aminophylline 30 mg/mL, Ergoloid Mesylate 0.5 mg/mL, Pentoxifylline 50 mg/mL, Sildenafil Citrate 10 mg/mL, Testosterone 1 mg/mL, L-Arginine 60 mg/mL 30 mL Pump
  • Arousal 2: Aminophylline 30 mg/mL, Ergoloid Mesylate 0.5 mg/mL, Pentoxifylline 50 mg/mL, Sildenafil Citrate 10 mg/mL, Testosterone 1 mg/mL 30 mL Pump
  • Arousal 3: Aminophylline 30 mg/mL, Ergoloid Mesylate 0.5 mg/mL, Pentoxifylline 50 mg/mL, Testosterone 1 mg/mL, L-Arginine 60 mg/mL 30 mL Pump
  • Arousal 4: Aminophylline 30 mg/mL, Ergoloid Mesylate 0.5 mg/mL, Pentoxifylline 50 mg/mL, Sildenafil Citrate 10 mg/mL, L-Arginine 60 mg/mL 30 mL Pump
  • Arousal 5: Aminophylline 30 mg/mL, Ergoloid Mesylate 0.5 mg/mL, Pentoxifylline 50 mg/mL, Sildenafil Citrate 10 mg/mL 30 mL Pump

General Information

Arousal Cream, sometimes known as Scream Cream, is a topical cream that, when applied to the clitoris and/or external genitalia, can enhance blood flow to the affected area and has been shown to improve sensitivity and orgasm rates. Arousal Cream, made from a combination of prescription medicines, is intended to function locally without causing significant absorption into the bloodstream. This transdermal cream contains up to six distinct drugs and products, including aminophylline, ergoloid mesylate, L-arginine, pentoxifylline, sildenafil citrate, and testosterone. This synergistic drug combines the qualities of each substance (one bronchodilator, four vasodilators, and the powerful sex steroid hormone testosterone) to potentially improve female libido (sex drive) and sexual excitement.

Aminophylline
Theophylline is a xanthine derivative that is used orally or intravenously to treat neonatal apnea and as an adjunct medication in asthma patients. Tea contains theophylline, which is chemically related to caffeine and theobromine. 1 While theophylline was once widely used to treat asthma, it is now much less routinely used because there are more effective alternatives with better safety profiles. In children under the age of 12, oral theophylline is not indicated for asthma maintenance medication. Low-dose sustained-release oral theophylline is regarded an alternative, but not preferred, therapy to the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) in adolescents and adults, or may be used as an alternate, supplementary treatment to ICS in those with chronic asthma symptoms. 23 Intravenous aminophylline and theophylline are not indicated for the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations since they appear to offer little benefit to appropriate inhaled beta2-agonist therapy and may increase the risk of adverse effects. 2 There is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of low-dose theophylline on COPD exacerbation rates; in general, the drug has a moderate bronchodilator effect that may result in an additive but mild improvement in FEV1 when used with beta-agonists. When theophylline dosages achieve therapeutic benefit, the risk of toxicity increases. Because of their limited efficacy at prescribed doses and the risk of adverse effects and toxicity, theophylline and aminophylline are not indicated for routine COPD treatment and should not be used in acute COPD exacerbations. 4 Theophylline is also licensed for the treatment of neonatal apnea of prematurity; however, due to its small therapeutic window for serum concentrations, it is typically used as a second-line therapy option after caffeine. Off-label uses of theophylline include the treatment of methotrexate toxicity, the management of renal impairment and the facilitation of extubation in newborns, the prevention of apnea during prostaglandin E1 infusion, and the prevention of apnea during prostaglandin E1 infusion. 56789 Theophylline prodrug aminophylline is the most often utilized form for IV treatment. Because 100 mg of aminophylline is comparable to 80 mg of theophylline, dose errors are likely, and doctors should carefully review dosage modifications and calculations when switching between the two medications.

Ergoloid Mesylate 
Ergoloid mesylates are a blend of manufactured and naturally occurring ergot alkaloids (dihydroergocornine, dihydroergocristine, and dihydroergocryptine). Ergoloid mesylates are approved to treat the symptoms of dementias such as vascular dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and primary progressive dementia. Ergoloid mesylates exhibit little adverse effects at therapeutic levels and lack the vasoconstrictor features of natural ergot alkaloids. Despite their superior safety profile, ergoloid mesylates’ significance in the treatment of various dementias remains debatable. The majority of research examining ergoloid mesylates for vascular dementia were carried out prior to the adoption of defined diagnostic criteria, and study findings have been uneven. The use of ergoloid mesylates in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease is not recommended by practice guidelines. 10111213141516

Pentoxifylline
Pentoxifylline is a synthetic dimethylxanthine derivative related to theophylline and caffeine in structure. Unlike these drugs, pentoxifylline has hematological effects that make it effective in the symptomatic treatment of peripheral vascular disease sequelae. Pentoxifylline has also been used to treat chronic and acute cerebrovascular insufficiency, sickle cell disease17, and severe diabetic neuropathy. 18 The FDA authorized pentoxifylline in August 1984.

Sildenafil
Originally intended to treat pulmonary hypertension, angina, and other cardiovascular diseases, sildenafil citrate was unintentionally discovered to be useful in males suffering from erectile dysfunction (ED). Prior to the discovery of its therapeutic effects in the treatment of ED, this condition was thought to be an unavoidable component of aging in men or the result of underlying psychological problems. After being approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1998 for the treatment of ED, sildenafil citrate’s popularity has skyrocketed over the last few decades, with health care providers generally recommending this medication as first-line therapy in the management of erectile dysfunction in men. Other aspects that contribute to its attraction and popularity include the fact that sildenafil citrate can be taken orally on demand and is generally well tolerated with little side effects. 1

Sildenafil citrate is a vasoactive medicine that belongs to the pharmacologic class of PDE-5 inhibitors; it is a competitive antagonist of this enzyme. PDE-5 is distributed throughout the human body, particularly in the corpus cavernosum within the penis, striated and smooth muscle, and platelets. However, PDE-5 is more prevalent in the penile corpus cavernosum, which explains why sildenafil citrate can function selectively in this area of the body. 2

Sildenafil citrate is often used orally. It can, however, be given intravenously or sublingually. Although its most common therapeutic application is for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, it is also used to treat pulmonary hypertension, infant pulmonary hypertension, Raynaud’s phenomenon refractory to other vasodilators, and to prevent pulmonary edema at high altitudes. Following oral administration, sildenafil citrate is rapidly absorbed, primarily in the small intestine, and is then carried through the bloodstream to its site of action. The hepatic isoenzymes cytochrome P450 3A4 and cytochrome P450 2C9 metabolize sildenafil citrate in the liver. Following hepatic metabolism, metabolites are primarily eliminated in the stool and, to a lesser extent, in the urine. 234

The Food and Medication Administration classifies sildenafil citrate as a pregnancy category B drug. Studies have found no definitive dangers to fetuses when sildenafil is given to pregnant women. There are currently no proven clinical indications for the use of sildenafil citrate in women. To yet, no studies have shown that sildenafil citrate has the same benefits in women as it does in men. Other trials, however, are still continuing, and the results may provide additional insight into the usability and benefits of sildenafil in women. 5

Arginine
The synthetic derivative of the essential amino acid L-arginine is arginine hydrochloride. In diseases such as panhypopituitarism, pituitary dwarfism, chromophobe adenoma, postsurgical craniopharyngioma, hypophysectomy, pituitary trauma, and issues with growth and stature, arginine hydrochloride may be utilized to aid in the diagnosis of growth hormone insufficiency. The medication has also been used to assess pituitary function in gigantism and acromegaly. Arginine injection is also used to treat elevated ammonia levels in patients with urea cycle disorders. Dietary supplement arginine tablets have been utilized to improve exercise capacity in patients with stable angina pectoris. 19 The FDA first approved arginine injection in February 1973.

Testosterone
The predominant androgen present in the body is testosterone. Cells in the testis, ovary, and adrenal cortex produce endogenous testosterone. In the treatment of hypogonadism, either congenital or acquired, testosterone is employed. Testosterone is also the most effective exogenous androgen for the palliative treatment of postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Testosterone was first used in 1938, and the FDA approved it in 1939. Anabolic steroids, which are testosterone derivatives, have been used illegally and are now restricted substances. In 1991, testosterone, like many anabolic steroids, was designated as a restricted substance. Uniumed Pharmaceuticals developed testosterone cream as AndroGel in the United States, and it was FDA approved in 2000 for the treatment of testosterone deficiency, which often results in a variety of hypogonadic conditions ranging from mood and energy to sexual dysfunctions, as well as a treatment for several injury-related conditions such as those experienced by severe burn and accident victims. AndroGel is a very popular form of testosterone that is sold around the world under a few less well-known brand/trade names, most notably Testogel (manufactured in the UK by Laboratoires Besins and distributed by Bayer), Testim (manufactured in the US by Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.), and various generic versions often sold under the name testosterone cream or gel.

The transdermal testosterone gel delivery technique targets the same, or very comparable, body locations as injections and other kinds of testosterone. More specifically, maximum absorption of testosterone gel is attained when it is delivered to heavily muscled bodily regions (as with injectable testosterone). Because more muscle at the area of application correlates to a greater number of testosterone-absorbing capillaries, testosterone may be shuttled into the bloodstream more quickly.

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