Phendimetrazine Tartrate Tablets

Overview of Phendimetrazine Tartrate Tablets

Dosage Strength

35 mg Tablet
105 mg Extended-Release Capsule

General Information

Phendimetrazine is a nonamphetamine sympathomimetic amine that is taken orally. It is used as a short-term (8 to 12 weeks) anoretic adjuvant in the treatment of exogenous obesity. Phendimetrazine has similar pharmacologic effects to amphetamines. Phendimetrazine is only approved for usage as a single agent. The FDA authorized this medication in 1961.

Phendimetrazine tartrate is a weight loss drug that is chemically similar to amphetamines and is often used to treat obesity. Phendimetrazine tartrate, an appetite suppressant, is classified as a Schedule III substance by the Convention on Psychotropic Substances and the Uniform Controlled Substances Act of 1970.

When phendimetrazine tartrate was created in Germany in 1954, it was soon recognized for its efficacy and prospective benefits. By the 1960s, it had satisfied the FDA’s approval standards, passing its safety and effectiveness testing as an approved weight loss formula, and its popularity surged in the mid-1990s after the FDA banned the diet pill Ephedra for its hazardous and potentially fatal side effects.

According to the most recent diet pill rankings, phendimetrazine tartrate is the second most popular appetite suppressant compound in America, and when used as advised, it is regarded an effective and safe weight control assistance.

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