Relax Cream

Overview of Relax Cream

Dosage Strength

Relax Cream (Magnesium Chloride / Melatonin / Taurine / Theanine) 10/0.3/10/5%
Relax Max Cream (Magnesium Chloride / Melatonin / Taurine / Theanine) 10/0.3/25/10%

General Information

Magnesium Chloride
Magnesium, a divalent cation and the second most prevalent intracellular cation in the body after potassium, is essential in several enzymatic activities related to nucleic acid synthesis and energy metabolism. 1 Magnesium is also required for glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, osteogenesis and bone ossification, and RNA and DNA synthesis. Magnesium also plays an important role in the regulation of the enzyme Na+/K+ ATPase, which regulates the intracellular and extracellular transport of sodium and potassium in live cells. 2 3 Magnesium is contained in a variety of foods, including cereals and legumes, and is eliminated from the body through the kidneys. 4

Magnesium salts are clinically used to deliver magnesium to the body. Magnesium chloride is one of the most commonly utilized magnesium compounds in therapeutic practice. It consists of a magnesium halide linked to two inorganic chloride ions and is very water soluble. 5 Peritoneal dialysis, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), fluid and electrolyte replacement, and the management of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular arrhythmia, and atherosclerosis are some clinical indications for the use of magnesium chloride when administered parenterally. 678 Magnesium chloride is expressed in breast milk in breastfeeding mothers and is designated as a pregnancy category C medicine by the Food and Drug Administration; it should only be supplied to pregnant women when the benefits outweigh the hazards. 9

Melatonin
Melatonin, also known as 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is a neurohormone that is used to control sleep-wake cycles in people who suffer from sleep disorders. The pineal gland secretes endogenous melatonin in all animals that have circadian or circannual cycles. Melatonin has been shown to have a role in the maintenance of sleep-wake rhythms, and supplementation may assist to manage sleep abnormalities caused by insomnia, jet lag, rotating shift work, depression, chronic renal illness, critical care unit stays, and different neurological disorders. Melatonin clinical research is continuing to elucidate the role of melatonin in a number of neurologic, hormonal, gastrointestinal, and neoplastic illnesses. Melatonin’s actions as a hormone were first seen in 1917, when dark-skinned tadpoles fed a pineal gland extract developed lighter skin. In 1958, melatonin was isolated from the pineal gland. Commercial melatonin products are mostly made from 5-methoxyindole, with a few exceptions derived from animal (bovine) pineal glands. The use of animal-derived melatonin products is not advised due to the risk of contamination with animal-derived infectious prions and viruses, which can cause significant sickness. Oral melatonin is listed in Health Canada’s Natural Health Products ingredients/monograph database. 10 Melatonin is only available by prescription in Europe under the trade name Circadin, and it is marketed as a monotherapy for the short-term treatment of primary insomnia characterized by poor sleep quality in individuals aged 55 and up. 11 Melatonin is considered an experimental medicine by the American Sleep Disorder Association and should not be used without medical supervision. Melatonin has been designated as an orphan drug by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1993 for circadian rhythm sleep disorders in blind patients with no light perception, a condition known as non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (non-24), which occurs when the blind patient’s circadian rhythms cannot be synchronized to a light-dark cycle. The FDA gave melatonin another orphan drug status in 2013 for the treatment of neonatal hypoxia ischemic encephalopathy. Melatonin is also accessible in the United States without a prescription, and products are sold under the Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act of 1994. (DSHEA).

NOTE: Nutraceuticals are promoted in the United States under the Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act of 1994. (DSHEA). As a result, scientific data supporting claimed benefits are not always available for nutraceuticals, as they are for traditional pharmaceuticals, because nutraceuticals are not regulated as drugs. Consumers should also be aware that strict quality control standards are not necessary for nutraceuticals, and that significant fluctuation in both potency and purity can occur.

Melatonin, also known as 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is a neurohormone that is used to control sleep-wake cycles in people who suffer from sleep disorders. The pineal gland secretes endogenous melatonin in all animals that have circadian or circannual cycles. Melatonin has been shown to have a role in the maintenance of sleep-wake rhythms, and supplementation may assist to manage sleep abnormalities caused by insomnia, jet lag, rotating shift work, depression, chronic renal illness, critical care unit stays, and different neurological disorders. Melatonin clinical research is continuing to elucidate the role of melatonin in a number of neurologic, hormonal, gastrointestinal, and neoplastic illnesses. Melatonin’s actions as a hormone were first seen in 1917, when dark-skinned tadpoles fed a pineal gland extract developed lighter skin. In 1958, melatonin was isolated from the pineal gland. Commercial melatonin products are mostly made from 5-methoxyindole, with a few exceptions derived from animal (bovine) pineal glands. The use of animal-derived melatonin products is not advised due to the risk of contamination with animal-derived infectious prions and viruses, which can cause significant sickness. Oral melatonin is listed in Health Canada’s Natural Health Products ingredients/monograph database. 10 Melatonin is only available by prescription in Europe under the trade name Circadin, and it is marketed as a monotherapy for the short-term treatment of primary insomnia characterized by poor sleep quality in individuals aged 55 and up. 11 Melatonin is considered an experimental medicine by the American Sleep Disorder Association and should not be used without medical supervision. Melatonin has been designated as an orphan drug by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1993 for circadian rhythm sleep disorders in blind patients with no light perception, a condition known as non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (non-24), which occurs when the blind patient’s circadian rhythms cannot be synchronized to a light-dark cycle. The FDA gave melatonin another orphan drug status in 2013 for the treatment of neonatal hypoxia ischemic encephalopathy. Melatonin is also accessible in the United States without a prescription, and products are sold under the Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act of 1994. (DSHEA).

NOTE: Nutraceuticals are promoted in the United States under the Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act of 1994. (DSHEA). As a result, scientific data supporting claimed benefits are not always available for nutraceuticals, as they are for traditional pharmaceuticals, because nutraceuticals are not regulated as drugs. Consumers should also be aware that strict quality control standards are not necessary for nutraceuticals, and that significant fluctuation in both potency and purity can occur.

Taurine

Studies strongly show that taurine supplementation, even if taken for a short period of time, may enhance greater physical function, reduce cardiovascular risks connected with exercise, and improve difficulties linked with heart failure. 1213

Taurine may help with this by reducing inflammation and blood pressure. According to certain studies, taurine may help to relax the nervous system and perhaps improve the function of the heart’s left ventricle.

Although further research is needed to validate these benefits, the research that has already been undertaken is encouraging for anyone concerned about cardiac health or suffering from heart disease. 1213

After examining animal and human trials, a meta-analysis study published in the journal Food & Function discovered that taurine had a beneficial activity against the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. 14

Taurine was discovered to cut triglycerides, prevent obesity, improve insulin resistance, control glucose metabolism, lower cholesterol, and lower blood pressure.

Taurine may also aid in the healing of periodontal disease damage. Taurine was tested on patients with chronic periodontitis to see whether it could aid in the healing process. Taurine was found to considerably aid the healing process. This study suggests that it may have done so through increasing levels of lipid peroxidation products and antioxidant enzymes. 15

A research at the University of Stirling looked at athletes who raced middle distance races before and after using taurine supplements. The athletes drank 1,000 milligrams of taurine two hours before running, and their respiratory systems, heart rates, and blood lactate levels were all examined to ensure that there was no effect. Following that, 90% of the racers posted faster timings. According to this study, there is a 99.3 percent possibility that taurine was responsible for the athletes’ enhanced performance throughout the time trial. 16

Other research suggests that when paired with coffee, taurine may have a substantial mood-boosting impact. Scientists have discovered compelling evidence that combining taurine and caffeine may improve mood and possibly cognitive performance. 17

Taurine is one of the most abundant amino acids in the human eye, outnumbering any other amino acid in concentration. As a result, new research has discovered that maintaining high amounts of taurine is critical to preventing cell degeneration in the eye. 18

References

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